Outrageously Cheap

The comedian John Oliver delivered a well-researched and expertly-executed tirade about the dangerous—and morally questionable—implications of outrageously cheap clothing on his HBO show Last Week Tonight:

“One of the biggest problems with holding many brands accountable, is that deniability seems to have been stitched into the supply chain,” says Oliver, referring to the chronic issue of unauthorized subcontracting: Clothing brands work directly with presumably safe, audited factories, which then outsource production to less regulated, off-the-map facilities. Then, when disaster strikes, Western brands can say that they had no knowledge of the subcontracting relationship.

“Clothing brands are losing the right to act surprised,” says Oliver. “They’re like the characters in The Hangover movies. It’s not an accident the third time, boys—it’s a pattern of reckless behavior which has to be addressed.”

Oliver’s piece comes at the two-year anniversary of the Rana Plaza factory complex collapse outside Dhaka, Bangladesh, which killed more than 1,130 people, most of them women garment workers.

The world was justifiably horrified by that tragedy. And yet, as Oliver points out, it wasn’t long before daytime TV shows were again extolling the wonders of a cheap knockoff blouse, by the same brand that had produced clothes in those deadly factory conditions.

“Nineteen bucks! Get out! Get out. Get the fuck out of the studio and think about what you’re doing,” he says. “We get so blinded by low prices.”

Earth Day Fashion

Happy Earth Day!  In the spirit of Momma Earth, today us Filthy gals will be giving some love to three, eco-friendly fashion lines that you need to check out.
itwasalladream19_copy_copyDelikate Rayne
Ethical. Sustainable. Luxurious. What more could you ask of  this delicate cruelty-free line?  Their crisp designs feature cruelty-free, vegan textiles to create a truly inspiring collection.  In fact, we’d be hard pressed to find styles more refined than these.

298A1639Bon George
Do you love vintage as much as us?  If so, this eco-conscious gem is not to be missed. The folks at Bon George are committed to delivering classic designs constructed out of salvaged vintage fabrics. Plus, their line is positively drop-dead gorgeous.
3Loomstate
High quality and high eco-friendly standards intersect at this comfy-cozy brand. The sporty line made a commitment to only use organic cotton and sustainable practices, and they intend to keep that pact.

For many more eco-friendly fashion lines, check out our Earth Day source – EOnline.  Did we miss any of your favorite eco-friendly duds?  If so, let us know in the comments below.  Have a great Earth Day!  Tread lightly and be kind.  Xo.

Adidas New Pledge

In an effort to bolster its commitment to sustainability, Adidas announced on Monday that it would begin developing materials out of plastic ocean waste to ultimately use in its products.

In a press release, the iconic clothing corporation said it’s teaming up with the Parley for the Oceans, a group of artists, scientists, musicians and designers dedicated to cleaning up the world’s oceans. Together, they plan on developing fibers made from plastic ocean waste that can be used in the manufacturing of clothing and potentially in shoes.

areyouready-plastic-bags

In the short term, Adidas also pledged to phase out plastic bags at its 2,900 stores worldwide.

 

“By partnering with Parley for the Oceans, we’re contributing to a great environmental cause and co-creating new fabrics from ocean plastic waste that we’ll gradually and constantly integrate into our product,” Maria Culp, a spokesperson for Adidas, told ThinkProgress.

According to a recent study in Science, between 5 and 13 million metric tons of plastic waste ended up in oceans in 2010 alone, an amount that’s expected to increase in the coming decades if waste disposal techniques aren’t improved. Another study estimatedthat the ocean has about 600 pieces of plastic in it per every person living on earth.

Each ocean has its own massive whirlpool of plastic debris, but those patches only account for 1 percent of the plastic thought to be in oceans. No one really knows what happens to the other 99 percent — it might wash back to shore, it might breakdown into very small bits, or it might be eaten by fish and enter into the food chain.

Adidas isn’t the first company to look to marine plastic waste for innovative manufacturing materials. Last year, G-Star Raw denim partnered with producer and musician Pharrell Williams to debut a line of jeans made with fabric spun from recycled ocean debris. Williams is the creative director of Bionic Yarn, which creates fabric primarily using plastic bottles.

Bionic Yarn has also partnered with Parley to create the Vortex Project, whose mission is to retrieve marine plastic and transform it into yarn that can be used in manufacturing garments for the fashion industry.

The partnership is just one part of Adidas’ growing commitment to sustainability, which it outlined in its 2014 Sustainability Progress Report. The company also sourced 30 percentof its cotton from sustainable sources in 2014, exceeding the goal of 25 percent that it had set for itself. Ultimately, Adidas says it wants to source 40 percent of its cotton from sustainable sources by the end of the year, with the goal of transitioning to 100 percent sustainable cotton by 2018.

2014 also marked the opening of Adidas’ first “green” retail store in Nuremberg, Germany. The store is run by an intelligent control system that automatically optimizes the store’s heating, cooling, and ventilation. It’s also completely outfitted with LED lights, and other energy-efficient devices meant to reduce the store’s overall carbon footprint.

As environmental groups like Greenpeace pressure fashion companies to become more sustainable in both sourcing and production, Adidas isn’t the only company to shift its attention toward sustainability. According to Reuters, the Swedish retailer H&M — which is the leading user of organic cotton in the world — has committed to tripling the amount of products made from recycled fibers by the end of 2015. In late March, Eileen Fisher also announced plans to begin sourcing only organic linen and cotton in the hopes of becoming 100 percent sustainable by 2020.

Source: Think Progress

Fruity Arbor Day

FruityIf there is one certainty in this big, bad, filthy World – we can assure you that the girls that run Filthy Rebena love to eat, drink and wear the fruits of the forest.  Natalie and Darlene are busy this arbor day tending to their gardens and getting juicy!  They spent some time thanking the trees for their fruits, blissful smells and for their billowy rayon fabric.  Trees are essential to life as we know it.  Be kind to the planet.  Reduce, reuse and recycle fellow Rebenas.  Happy Arbor Day!