Shark Week Fashion

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Espadrilles and checked shorts find new life at Dolce & Gabbana.

The Fourth of July. Memorial Day. Shark Week.  Some holidays just bring out one’s inner patriot.

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Tiger of Sweden sets sail with a take on the Greek fisherman’s cap.

In honor of Discovery’s celebration of the ocean’s most fearsome fellow, which kicks off today, we’re looking back at the best seafaring fare from the latest round of men’s shows.

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Among Alessandro Dell’Acqua’s tide turn at No. 21 was this anchor intarsia knit.

Get into the drink with these looks above!  Repeat viewings of Jaws optional, though heartily encouraged.
shark-week-nautical-fashion-resort-2016-14For more great nautical and resort menswear, check out our source: Style.com

Were the tentacles seen on Antonio Marras' blazer those of an octopus, or something more mythical from 20,000 leagues under the sea?

Were the tentacles seen on Antonio Marras’ blazer those of an octopus, or something more mythical from 20,000 leagues under the sea?

Tilda’s Cloakroom

Tilda Swinton in Cloakroom Photo: New Press Photo / Splash News

Tilda Swinton in Cloakroom Photo: New Press Photo / Splash News

Tilda Swinton’s latest role: a piece of performance art in which she interacts – and chats – with coats.  The actress is the star of Cloakroom, which is being staged at the Pitti Uomo menswear show in Florence, Italy.  The 90-minute performance sees Swinton taking clothes that have been checked in by audience members on arrival, and treating them as her co-stars. She nuzzled a red mohair coat, buried her face in a suit jacket and had a conversation with a gilet.

Interaction with the clothes involved “studying them, caressing them – she licked the floral lining and at least one button of someone’s blazer – and even chatting to them. ‘She’s not even here,’ she reassured a pompom scarf, and later, to a jacket, ‘Don’t be silly!’”

The show is the brainchild of Olivier Saillard, a fashion critic and historian, with whom Swinton has collaborated in the past.  It has a serious point to make about our relationship with clothes and the role they play in our lives – an antidote to “fast fashion”. Swinton told i-D magazine she was interested in “the soul of clothes”.

The show is the brainchild of Olivier Saillard (Splash)

The show is the brainchild of Olivier Saillard (Splash)

She said: “The more I do this piece, the more I realise it’s about making relationships. We all have relationships with an old jersey that people have told us to throw out, but we’re not going to because you know what? You’ve got a very strong relationship with that thing.”  Asked if she disliked fast fashion, Swinton replied: “I don’t even really know what it is. I’m pretty slow in every department.”

Source: Telegraph UK

Androgynous Clothing

Natalia Manzocco is the owner of Future is the Future, a gender-neutral online clothing store that stocks vintage and used items.

Natalia Manzocco, owner of Future is the Future, a gender-neutral online clothing store that stocks vintage and used items.

Natalia Manzocco is no stranger to thrift stores. The owner of an online gender-neutral clothing website spends hours sifting through racks of used garments for pieces that accentuate both a man’s muscles and a woman’s curves.

Manzocco, a 27-year-old Riverdale resident, began selling clothing and accessories meant for both sexes at Future is the Future. She’s yet to hear of anyone else in the GTA operating under the same concept, but in the U.S. and Scandinavia gender-analogous stores are starting to take off.  Manzocco’s crusade to break store gender divisions was born from her penchant for mixing menswear pieces into her wardrobe.

This white knit sweater is modelled by a woman and by a man.

This white knit sweater is modelled by a woman and by a man.

“I was thinking wouldn’t it be awesome if I could find a vintage men’s tuxedo, but shopping for vintage clothing is difficult because of the variation in how things are cut,” she says.  Instead of taking a second-hand men’s tux to a tailor or settling for a similar women’s version, she put together Future is the Future in hopes of giving others facing similar predicaments a place to shop.  Among the handful of used items she has in stock is a patterned blue-and-white Joe Fresh button-down for $15 and a bright green, vintage varsity jacket emblazoned with the name Herman for $35.

“If something really leaps out at me, I will buy it,” Manzocco says. “If I find something glittery, I will throw that in there, too, because people of all genders like sparkles.”

Mixing a denim button-down.

Mixing a denim button-down.

For each gender-neutral piece, Manzocco provides the length, chest, waist and arm or sleeve measurements alongside traditional size labels for both men and women. A black, one-button, second-hand tuxedo jacket from J. Crew, for example, is marked as fitting like a men’s medium and women’s large.  Manzocco also carries accessories, including handmade reversible bow ties and floral lapel pins from Toronto accessories-maker Just Sultan and triangle-shaped, orange earrings from local jeweller Moonlight for Violet.

Future is the Future, which opened in November, functions primarily as a website, but Manzocco says she occasionally does markets and pop-ups. If interest grows, she will consider opening a bricks-and-mortar store in Toronto.

When Ben Barry, a fashion professor at Ryerson University and the founder of a self-named modelling agency, heard about Future is the Future, he says he was excited because he believes it is opening doors for “a lot more play, a lot more experimentation and an explosion of the gender binary.”  Women can get away with slouchy boyfriend jeans, oversized men’s dress shirts and even ties, but Barry says men garner more critical looks when they borrow their sartorial sense from women.

Accessories

Accessories

“Playing with colourful socks, bow ties and pocket squares can be seen as stepping outside the box of masculinity, so for men to be more outside of that box and wear floral shirts, skirts or heels, that could be seen as jeopardizing their masculinity even more,” he says.

Herman Vintage Varsity Jacket

Herman Vintage Varsity Jacket

Though designers such as Yves St. Laurent transformed the smoking jacket look into a women’s trend and J.W. Anderson filled his runway with skirt-wearing men, Barry says “the fashion industry is divided.”  It’s hard to change the industry because buyers browsing collections for their stores are shopping for men or women — not both, he says, adding that is bound to change.

“For some (Future is the Future) may be seen as radical, but a lot of people are rejecting these gender categories because they are a lot more playful with shopping in different sections and wearing garments that are made for men and women,” he says. “It’s the future of the fashion industry.”

Thrifted Button-Down

Thrifted Button-Down

Sara Medd, the founder of a Los Angeles-based clothing start-up, agrees.  Her soon-to-launch company, Greyscale Goods, scours the world for gender-neutral brands, which they pack into boxes based on an individual customer’s style. Buyers who receive the boxes rummage through the items choosing what they like before sending the rest back in a prepaid package within five days.

70's Button Down

70’s Button Down

“The true heart of the fashion industry is open-minded,” she says. “Androgynous clothing is nearly there. It’s the next step.”

Source: The Star