🌴 Filthy’s Cali Collection is debuting tomorrow! (Friday, July 21) Expect a sunny selection of clothing, and shoes hand picked from Los Angeles. There will be a collection of photography on the walls from the vacation along with 1/2 priced sunglasses with purchase. If you’re California dreamin’ or downtown London, please feel free to come in. 🌴

Image may contain: sky and outdoor

Sea Change

fishnet collection and recycling program developed and run by Bureo

Fishnet collection and recycling program developed and run by Bureo

Designed in collaboration with Karun, an eyewear company based in Chile, all three styles in the “Ocean Collection” comprise 100 percent traceable and recycled nylon from nets collected via Net Positiva, a first-of-its-kind fishnet collection and recycling program developed and run by Bureo’s own team.

Bureo Sunglasses Ocean

Ocean Collection $139

“For every pair of glasses purchased, Bureo will be able to further expand this community-based fishnet collection and recycling program, while generating funds for programs that empower coastal communities most affected by plastic pollution,” the company said.

Ocean Collection $139 sunglasses london toronto filthy rebena

Ocean Collection $139

But the collection’s unique composition has other benefits, too, according to the firm. Compared with virgin-plastic eyeglasses, Bureo’s recycled frames generate roughly 70 percent fewer greenhouse-gas emissions, thanks in part to a mechanical processing technique that uses no chemicals and minimal water to melt the nets into pellets.

Bureo Sunglasses Vintage Modern Shades

Ocean Collection $139

“This greatly differs from a ‘chemical recycling process’ which not only creates a waste byproduct but also requires heavy chemicals and water to break down the nets and return them to a form of nylon which can be made into thread for soft goods like clothing, swimwear and shoes,” Bureo said.

Ocean Collection $139Priced at $139 apiece, the sunglasses are available for sale online at shop.bureo.co, as well as at Pilgrim Surf + Supply in Brooklyn, Sawyer Land & Sea Supply in Santa Cruz, Calif., and Patagonia stores worldwide.

Ocean Collection $139

Ocean Collection $139

Androgynous Clothing

Natalia Manzocco is the owner of Future is the Future, a gender-neutral online clothing store that stocks vintage and used items.

Natalia Manzocco, owner of Future is the Future, a gender-neutral online clothing store that stocks vintage and used items.

Natalia Manzocco is no stranger to thrift stores. The owner of an online gender-neutral clothing website spends hours sifting through racks of used garments for pieces that accentuate both a man’s muscles and a woman’s curves.

Manzocco, a 27-year-old Riverdale resident, began selling clothing and accessories meant for both sexes at Future is the Future. She’s yet to hear of anyone else in the GTA operating under the same concept, but in the U.S. and Scandinavia gender-analogous stores are starting to take off.  Manzocco’s crusade to break store gender divisions was born from her penchant for mixing menswear pieces into her wardrobe.

This white knit sweater is modelled by a woman and by a man.

This white knit sweater is modelled by a woman and by a man.

“I was thinking wouldn’t it be awesome if I could find a vintage men’s tuxedo, but shopping for vintage clothing is difficult because of the variation in how things are cut,” she says.  Instead of taking a second-hand men’s tux to a tailor or settling for a similar women’s version, she put together Future is the Future in hopes of giving others facing similar predicaments a place to shop.  Among the handful of used items she has in stock is a patterned blue-and-white Joe Fresh button-down for $15 and a bright green, vintage varsity jacket emblazoned with the name Herman for $35.

“If something really leaps out at me, I will buy it,” Manzocco says. “If I find something glittery, I will throw that in there, too, because people of all genders like sparkles.”

Mixing a denim button-down.

Mixing a denim button-down.

For each gender-neutral piece, Manzocco provides the length, chest, waist and arm or sleeve measurements alongside traditional size labels for both men and women. A black, one-button, second-hand tuxedo jacket from J. Crew, for example, is marked as fitting like a men’s medium and women’s large.  Manzocco also carries accessories, including handmade reversible bow ties and floral lapel pins from Toronto accessories-maker Just Sultan and triangle-shaped, orange earrings from local jeweller Moonlight for Violet.

Future is the Future, which opened in November, functions primarily as a website, but Manzocco says she occasionally does markets and pop-ups. If interest grows, she will consider opening a bricks-and-mortar store in Toronto.

When Ben Barry, a fashion professor at Ryerson University and the founder of a self-named modelling agency, heard about Future is the Future, he says he was excited because he believes it is opening doors for “a lot more play, a lot more experimentation and an explosion of the gender binary.”  Women can get away with slouchy boyfriend jeans, oversized men’s dress shirts and even ties, but Barry says men garner more critical looks when they borrow their sartorial sense from women.

Accessories

Accessories

“Playing with colourful socks, bow ties and pocket squares can be seen as stepping outside the box of masculinity, so for men to be more outside of that box and wear floral shirts, skirts or heels, that could be seen as jeopardizing their masculinity even more,” he says.

Herman Vintage Varsity Jacket

Herman Vintage Varsity Jacket

Though designers such as Yves St. Laurent transformed the smoking jacket look into a women’s trend and J.W. Anderson filled his runway with skirt-wearing men, Barry says “the fashion industry is divided.”  It’s hard to change the industry because buyers browsing collections for their stores are shopping for men or women — not both, he says, adding that is bound to change.

“For some (Future is the Future) may be seen as radical, but a lot of people are rejecting these gender categories because they are a lot more playful with shopping in different sections and wearing garments that are made for men and women,” he says. “It’s the future of the fashion industry.”

Thrifted Button-Down

Thrifted Button-Down

Sara Medd, the founder of a Los Angeles-based clothing start-up, agrees.  Her soon-to-launch company, Greyscale Goods, scours the world for gender-neutral brands, which they pack into boxes based on an individual customer’s style. Buyers who receive the boxes rummage through the items choosing what they like before sending the rest back in a prepaid package within five days.

70's Button Down

70’s Button Down

“The true heart of the fashion industry is open-minded,” she says. “Androgynous clothing is nearly there. It’s the next step.”

Source: The Star

AA

Re-constructed from vintage fabrics, featuring a pink and yellow zinnia print on red rayon. Ruched elastic edges. Crème cotton jersey lining.

Different sizes and prints of this style are available at a California Select/American Apparel near you. For a full list of locations, please visit www.caliselect.com.

This California Select Original piece was handmade at the American Apparel Factory in downtown Los Angeles by sewers earning a fair wage. California Select re-imagines the old, recycling fashions of the past into unique pieces that are both classic and modern at the same time.