Stylinity

1style

A new app that pays you for your fashion selfies

Love shopping and sharing selfies in your new outfits, but wish you’d get a few more likes? You guessed it: There’s an app for that. “Stylinity” connects retailers with their customers, letting users easily share shoppable images and earn rewards for the purchases that they help influence.

With Stylinity, users scan the barcode on products that they try on, which attaches a shoppable link and product description along with any photos they share of themselves wearing the products. That way, if their friends want to buy the product, they don’t have to go scrambling to a store or scout for it online — there’s a direct link to it. It’s a win-win scenario: users earning reward points from the retailers the app partners with redeemable for cash or products.

It’s like an automated photo booth in the dressing room.  It plays on the fun part of discovery, without the tedium of having to search for products.

The app has partnerships with over 180 retailers — from Nordstorm to Urban Outfitters — and caters largely to women in the 18-34 age range. It not only lets users store their images in a “closet” and reap the benefits of being brand evangelists, but also enables retailers to get word-of-mouth publicity as well as provide a better customer experience for its customers.

U.K.-based fast fashion e-retailer Boohoo partnered with Stylinity last October, when it opened a pop-up store in New York City. Stylinity helped the brand generate considerable buzz among its target audience in what was its first step to expand outside of the U.K.

Style

A new app that pays you for your fashion selfies

Shoppable images have been promising to revolutionize e-commerce lately, without quite fully delivering yet. They help brands monetize their large social followings go from merely “liking” pictures on social platforms, to actually making a purchase. Companies like Curalate, for example, help brands use their profile links to direct visitors from pictures on social media directly to their retail websites.

Stylinity is different because a selfie is authentic, user-generated content. It doesn’t repel customers and makes brands more real.  Will you be checking out Stylinity?

Source: DigDay

Androgynous Clothing

Natalia Manzocco is the owner of Future is the Future, a gender-neutral online clothing store that stocks vintage and used items.

Natalia Manzocco, owner of Future is the Future, a gender-neutral online clothing store that stocks vintage and used items.

Natalia Manzocco is no stranger to thrift stores. The owner of an online gender-neutral clothing website spends hours sifting through racks of used garments for pieces that accentuate both a man’s muscles and a woman’s curves.

Manzocco, a 27-year-old Riverdale resident, began selling clothing and accessories meant for both sexes at Future is the Future. She’s yet to hear of anyone else in the GTA operating under the same concept, but in the U.S. and Scandinavia gender-analogous stores are starting to take off.  Manzocco’s crusade to break store gender divisions was born from her penchant for mixing menswear pieces into her wardrobe.

This white knit sweater is modelled by a woman and by a man.

This white knit sweater is modelled by a woman and by a man.

“I was thinking wouldn’t it be awesome if I could find a vintage men’s tuxedo, but shopping for vintage clothing is difficult because of the variation in how things are cut,” she says.  Instead of taking a second-hand men’s tux to a tailor or settling for a similar women’s version, she put together Future is the Future in hopes of giving others facing similar predicaments a place to shop.  Among the handful of used items she has in stock is a patterned blue-and-white Joe Fresh button-down for $15 and a bright green, vintage varsity jacket emblazoned with the name Herman for $35.

“If something really leaps out at me, I will buy it,” Manzocco says. “If I find something glittery, I will throw that in there, too, because people of all genders like sparkles.”

Mixing a denim button-down.

Mixing a denim button-down.

For each gender-neutral piece, Manzocco provides the length, chest, waist and arm or sleeve measurements alongside traditional size labels for both men and women. A black, one-button, second-hand tuxedo jacket from J. Crew, for example, is marked as fitting like a men’s medium and women’s large.  Manzocco also carries accessories, including handmade reversible bow ties and floral lapel pins from Toronto accessories-maker Just Sultan and triangle-shaped, orange earrings from local jeweller Moonlight for Violet.

Future is the Future, which opened in November, functions primarily as a website, but Manzocco says she occasionally does markets and pop-ups. If interest grows, she will consider opening a bricks-and-mortar store in Toronto.

When Ben Barry, a fashion professor at Ryerson University and the founder of a self-named modelling agency, heard about Future is the Future, he says he was excited because he believes it is opening doors for “a lot more play, a lot more experimentation and an explosion of the gender binary.”  Women can get away with slouchy boyfriend jeans, oversized men’s dress shirts and even ties, but Barry says men garner more critical looks when they borrow their sartorial sense from women.

Accessories

Accessories

“Playing with colourful socks, bow ties and pocket squares can be seen as stepping outside the box of masculinity, so for men to be more outside of that box and wear floral shirts, skirts or heels, that could be seen as jeopardizing their masculinity even more,” he says.

Herman Vintage Varsity Jacket

Herman Vintage Varsity Jacket

Though designers such as Yves St. Laurent transformed the smoking jacket look into a women’s trend and J.W. Anderson filled his runway with skirt-wearing men, Barry says “the fashion industry is divided.”  It’s hard to change the industry because buyers browsing collections for their stores are shopping for men or women — not both, he says, adding that is bound to change.

“For some (Future is the Future) may be seen as radical, but a lot of people are rejecting these gender categories because they are a lot more playful with shopping in different sections and wearing garments that are made for men and women,” he says. “It’s the future of the fashion industry.”

Thrifted Button-Down

Thrifted Button-Down

Sara Medd, the founder of a Los Angeles-based clothing start-up, agrees.  Her soon-to-launch company, Greyscale Goods, scours the world for gender-neutral brands, which they pack into boxes based on an individual customer’s style. Buyers who receive the boxes rummage through the items choosing what they like before sending the rest back in a prepaid package within five days.

70's Button Down

70’s Button Down

“The true heart of the fashion industry is open-minded,” she says. “Androgynous clothing is nearly there. It’s the next step.”

Source: The Star

Pretty Clothes, Ugly Reality

Following January’s violent crackdown on Cambodian garment workers, a group of women decided they wanted a new way to draw attention to the workers’ struggle; something different where workers could express for themselves what was really going on.

They decided on a fashion show where workers would model the brand-name clothes they make everyday in the factories, but they’d do it with a very clear message to the brands – stop the violence, stop the exploitation and pay a decent wage. The show weaved together fashion, dance, music, and performance art; at one point men dressed in makeshift ‘Joe Fresh’ riot gear took to the catwalk before reenacting January’s violent crackdown and the death of a worker on stage. For more information on how Cambodian garment workers are draw attention to their rights, click here.
Garment workers recover after 100 women fainted at Sabrina Garment factory - a supplier of Nike and Lululemon.
Photograph: Garment workers recover after 100 women fainted at Sabrina Garment factory – a supplier of Nike and Lululemon.  Filthy Rebena is committed to fighting for a living wage for Cambodian garment workers.  We are lucky enough to have sexy and savvy customers that make the conscious choice to purchase garments from Filthy Rebena as 5% of their purchase goes to “Labour Behind The Label”.   Labour Behind The Label is an organization that supports the principle of a living wage for garment workers world wide.  Together we can make a difference in the lives of Cambodian workers.

Source: Heather Stilwell

Slime Punk

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SlimePunk

German brand URB has released a line of tights that offers wearers the illusion of having been recently slimed. They are, yes, icky — but, not without merit. These technical marvels are each handmade (hand slimed?) with a layer of Latex and baby powder. The novel tights remind us of the challenging nail-art designs or “slime-punk” followers on Tumblr. Any of you interested?