10 Decades of Beauty

Wanna see something cool?  This is a seamless transition of 10 decades of beauty trends in less than 90 seconds!

Cut Video’s “100 Years of Beauty in 1 Minute” takes a model through 10 transformations, revealing the hair and makeup styles of years past. The clip speeds by quickly, but it takes a team of styling professionals to mold a pretty girl into each decade’s beauty standard.

As the looks range from the bobbed pin curls and cupid lips of the 1920s to the bouffant and crimson smile of the 1950s, the video also explores popular expressions of femininity. A woman in the 1960s might sport a peace sign along with bright blue eye shadow, and a more recent style of glossy lips likely demanded a selfie in 2010.

It’s no secret that hair and makeup styles evolve over the years, and we’re broadly influenced by popular media, conforming to certain trends to fit in. But with the stance on what is considered beautiful changing so drastically every 10 years or so, maybe we can hold off on jumping on each and every fashion bandwagon. As someone who irreparably fried her hair, I recommend not beating your appearance into submission simply for a style that will fade. Also, that picture of you sticking out your tongue and making a horn symbol with your hand could haunt you on the Internet forever.

As for today’s beauty standards? Looks like they don’t mean much, and they’re likely to mean even less tomorrow.

Source: Samantha Cowan contributor for TakePart

Jantzen Ad 1957

Jan

There is something deep seeded in humans to explore fresh ideas and find better solutions.  Perhaps that is why we have such a yearning and respect for vintage treasure.  We forever appreciate timeless elegance, beauty and well made products.  Maybe it’s why Jantzen is such a respected vintage label.  The company has been around since the dinosaurs and seems to live by that timeless philosophy, “If it isn’t broken, don’t try to fix it.”  Forever timeless and forever classic.  

Leanin’ Lipstick

Lipstick

It’s no doubt that package design just adores the Leaning Tower of Pisa.   We have Liqueur Pisa, the Leaning Tower of Peas and even Pisa inspired thimbles that come in their town boxes.  As a profound lover of lipstick, this 1950’s lipstick case by jewelry designer Louis Nichilo takes the take.  Here is the cutest remark from Travel Magazine, Circa: 1962.  “For women: If what you’ve always wanted is a lipstick case that looks like the Leaning Tower of Pisa, you can have it now. Gold plated, three inches high, with colored stones for decoration, it is made to fit all standard lipstick refills, costs 6.000 lire ($9.60) at Louis Nichilo, Via Sistina 42 In Rome.”

Diane Arbus Sundays

Diane Arbus was an American photographer and writer noted for black-and-white square photographs of “deviant and marginal people or of people whose normality seems ugly or surreal”.D

Working with her husband, Diane Arbus started out in advertising and fashion photography. She and Allan became quite a successful team, with photographs appearing in such magazines as Vogue. In the late 1950’s, she began to focus on her own photography. To further her art, Arbus studied with photographer Lisette Model around this time.
Identical Twins, 1967During her wanderings around New York City, Arbus began to pursue taking photographs of people she found. She visited seedy hotels, public parks, a morgue and other various locales. These unusual images had a raw quality, and several of them found their way into the July 1960 issue of Esquire magazine. These photographs proved to be a spring board for future work.
70By the mid-1960s, Diane Arbus had become a well-established photographer, participating in shows at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, among other places. She was known for going to great lengths to get the shots she wanted.
D2While professionally continuing to thrive in the late 1960’s, Arbus had some personal challenges. Her marriage to Allan Arbus ended in 1969, and she later struggled with depression. She committed suicide in her New York City apartment on July 26, 1971. Her work remains a subject of intense interest, and her life was the basis of the 2006 film Fur, starring Nicole Kidman as Arbus.
Diane-Arbus-portrait-w-quote3Source: Biography.com